What is Google Nearby

Google Nearby notifications can send URLs to passers-by without the need for an app. Here’s what you need to know about the latest beacon use case. Google Nearby has been growing in popularity in recent months. Ordinary businesses are learning about the opportunity to reach a new customer base and solution providers are seeing a brilliant opportunity to add value to their apps and platforms. However, with great popularity comes numerous questions. What is Google Nearby, how do Nearby notifications work, and how can you use it?

What is Google Nearby?
Google Nearby in Android allows users to discover nearby devices or contextual information without an app. There are three types of these interactions: nearby messages, communication, and notifications.

Messages supports small binary (unencrypted) payloads to be shared between Android and iOS devices.

Communications is about bringing nearby users together digitally. This could be for data transfers, multi-screen gaming, or other kinds of sharing.

Notifications send location-specific notifications to users, no app install required. These come in the form of secure URLs.

These Nearby Notifications are (now famously) linked to Bluetooth beacons. The good news is they’re easy to use and don’t require much in-depth knowledge. There are several reasons to use Google Nearby.

  1. Drive Downloads
  2. Share offers and product information
  3. Help visitors explore locations
  4. Push check-ins and reviews

How about a Google Nearby Example?

When Nearby first emerged, it was a big deal. Even now, it continues to make waves. Just recently, Google opened up their Connections API to developers. While it was previously only available to partners, now any and all happy Android developers can give it a go. Specifically, there are two key ways you can use Nearby.

Advertise a URL. Want to direct passers-by to your website? To a related page with information about your products and further content? Nearby can make this easy by sending a URL to your visitors and those in the area. Plus, you can add a 40 character title. For example, “Want free coffee?” or “Learn more about amphibious puppies!”

Trigger an app Intent. An Intent would be the description of an operation that is to be performed. For example, an action within an already installed app: open this option or file this data. When your user receives the app Intent via URL, the app will automatically run those parameters. If the app isn’t installed, it can direct users to the Play Store to download the app (or any other page). What better way to get people to notice your proximity-based app than a proximity-based notification?

How it works
Google Nearby is incredibly special because it is present on all modern Android devices. If you’re running any recent version of Android, you can see Nearby notifications. More importantly, your possible visitors or users can, too. This works through Google Play Services, which is a crucial (though often forgotten) beast that basically makes your phone work as expected. Locations APIs, Google Maps APIs, and several other things run through Google Play Services. It keeps your apps updated and, now, it’s letting Google support more possibilities on your phone.

A few frequently asked questions about Google Nearby with beacons:

  • Yes, it only works on Android
  • Yes, it does support iBeacon
  • Yes, it only sends URLs (HTTPS to be exact!)
  • No, links to play.google.com are not supported (use Intents instead)
  • No, it doesn’t support data tracking*

*While you may be able to see how many people access the link, you won’t be able to make any connection between the phone or user and a specific click.

How does Google Nearby scanning actually work?
The scanning process is actually very simple and very similar to work your phone does every day. Once the phone screen is on for a few seconds, Google Play Services will quickly scan for nearby material. 

This does mean that if the screen hasn’t been active for a while, it won’t discover beacons and content. This makes sense for users who are passing through. A user engaged on their phone is likely to also be engaged with or staying in a location for a period of time. A user who is not engaged with their phone at all is likely simply passing through the space and has little use for the proximity-based messages.

Why might notifications not be showing up? If you swipe away a notification, it will disappear for a longer and longer amount of time. For example, it may first just go away for a day, then a few days, and so on, as it clearly isn’t immediately useful to you. Okay, now for the big question…

 

Nearby vs. Physical Web: aren’t they the same?

While Nearby Notifications are built into Google Play Services, and therefore your Android phones, Physical Web is not. It runs through specific apps like Chrome or the Physical Web app itself. As a result, that means while Nearby works only on Android (which uses Google Play), Physical Web can be run on any phone (Android or iOS) that installs the related app. Furthermore, Physical Web will only send notifications when the user enables scanning. Nearby, on the other hand, is designed to run and scan quietly in the background.

Don’t want to setup beacons on your own and link to pages you have to pay a fortune for them give us a call and we will let you try our platform for 2 weeks free of charge no credit card required?


 

Introduction to Nearby Notifications

Google service key

In order to use the Nearby Notification module, you need to upload the Service Account Proximity Key. Instructions on how to do this can be found here.

Add Eddystone beacon

Before you can add Nearby Notifications, you first have to add the Namespace ID and Instance ID of an Eddystone beacon. You can find these IDs with the vendor's app or dashboard.

Add notifications

Now you can add notifications, optionally based on day and time.

Print the flyer

Nearby flyer 1.png